WELCOME TO MUSEUM VILLAGE OF OLD SMITH'S CLOVE

MUSEUM VILLAGE OF OLD SMITH'S CLOVE

Museum Village is a unique and inviting open-air historical museum which offers visitors the opportunity to explore vignettes of 19th century American life. Using a large collection of eclectic artifacts, the museum provides hands-on educational experiences and exhibits that illustrate the transition from a rural to an industrial culture and economy in America.

VIRTUAL TOUR

Here on our website you can view  virtual tour previews of our many exhibits. We hope these previews will inspire you to come visit us in person and enjoy our living history experience.

  • Pursuant to New York State law, ALL visitors over the age of 2 must wear masks or acceptable face coverings while at Museum Village unless they are exempt under the current face-covering order. (You may view the NYS Executive Order regarding face coverings here: https://regs.health.ny.gov/volume-1a-title-10/content/section-66-32-face-coverings)
  • We ask that all visitors observe six-foot physical distancing between your party and other parties at all times, including while outdoors.
  • Hand sanitizer is available for use in the Gift Shop and Restrooms.
  • Restroom Occupancy is limited to 1 person or 1 family at a time.
  • Please diligently observe all signage and directional guides, which may indicate one-way traffic, and provide helpful reminders to ensure a steady and safe flow throughout the Village.

CELEBRATING 70 YEARS OF PROVIDING EDUCATION, LIVING HISTORY AND COMMUNITY

FEATURED OBJECT

Candlestick Telephone

Date: circa 1901 - 1908

This telephone from the Museum Village collection is a table model with a removable ear piece. This particular model was patented between 1901-1908, and was probably used during that time period. Notice that it contains no dialing mechanism. This is because during the 1900s, in order to make a call, one had to pick up and speak to a switchboard operator, who would then connect you to your desired call destination by plugging various plugs into jacks on a large switchboard. The rotary dial telephone came into wide use in 1919, creating the ubiquitous "dial tone," and allowing users to make calls themselves without the assistance of an operator.